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Infographics

Nested Portlets Nested Portlets

Introduction Introduction

Green Climate Fund infographics seek to reduce the complexity of climate finance. See the areas that surround the foundational, core facets of the Fund's structure, partnerships, and work illustrated via our series of easy-to-digest visual resources.

Infographic List Infographic List

    • GCF Proposal Approval

      Funding proposals for projects and programmes are submitted by partners, cleared by GCF Headquarters, assessed by the Technical Advisory Panel, and approved by the Board before they can be implemented.

    • GCF Project Sizes

      GCF's Accredited Entities (AEs) are categorized into four distinct groups that determine the project size an entity can implement.

    • GCF Portfolio

      GCF strives towards a 50:50 balance between mitigation and adaptation in its portfolio, with special focus on Small Island Developing States (SIDS), Least Developed Countries (LDCs), and African States.

    • Scope of NDA/FP Role

      National Designated Authorities (NDAs) and Focal Points (FPs) are responsible to fulfill five key functions.

    • Urban and Rural Investments

      GCF looks to make investments in initiatives that support specific developments in urban and rural areas.

    • Strategic Impacts

      GCF has eight mitigation and adaptation results areas in which it seeks to have strategic impact towards the reduction of emissions and increase in resilience through its projects and programmes.

    • GCF Architecture

      GCF's architecture is characterized by strong country ownership: National Desiganted Authorities (NDAs) ensure that Accredited Entities (AEs) submit projects and programmes that benefit countries.

    • Investment Priorities

      GCF has five cross-cutting investment priorities that spread across its mitigation and adaptation results areas, which cover cities, energy, agriculture, forests, and Small Island Developing States (SIDS).

    • Global Mitigation Finance Flows (2013)

      Global finance flows for mitigation totalled to USD 302 billion in 2013 and have been mainly directed towards renewable energy projects, with less funding for energy efficiency. Source: Buchner et al , The Global Landscape of Climate Finance, Climate Policy Initiative (CPI) Report (San Francisco, CPI, 2014).

    • Global Adaptation Finance Flows (2013)

      Global finance flows for adaptation totalled to USD 25 billion in 2013 and have focused on water supply and management. Other areas of high potential have been inadequately funded through current channels. Source: Buchner et al, The Global Landscape of Climate Finance, Climate Policy Initiative (CPI) Report (San Francisco, CPI, 2014).

    • Annual Adaptation Costs by Region (2010-2050)

      Even the lowest estimates reveal that, until at least 2050, costs for adaptation in relation to Gross Domestic Product (GDP) will be highest in Small Island Developing States (SIDS) and Sub-Saharan Africa. Source: World Bank, “Economics of adaptation to climate change”, 2010.

    • Global Adaptation Cost for Africa

      Africa is home to one-seventh of the planet's population and is expected to represent nearly half of estimated global adaptation costs in the respective areas of agriculture and forestry, water supply, and health. Source: World Bank, “Economics of adaptation to climate change”, 2010.

    • Renewable Energy Investment by Region (2004-2014)

      Investment in renewable energy has been heavily concentrated in China, India, and Brazil, much of mitigation funding for which, however, has had limited risk tolerance to the detriment of innovation. Source: UNEP Bloomberg New Energy Finance Frankfurt School. Global Trends in Renewable Energy Investment 2014 (Frankfurt, 2014).

    • Vulnerability and Poverty by Region (2011-2013)

      Poverty and vulnerability to climate change both have their highest concentrations in Sub-Saharan Africa followed by South Asia, where increased resilience in the agriculture sector could be of major impact. Source: ND-GAIN Index 2014 and World Bank Poverty Indicators.

    • Co-Benefits of Forest Conservation

      The conservation of forests can account for as much as 30% of global mitigation potential and is expected to result in co-benefits in the areas of income, food, energy, health, safety, and public goods. Source: Center for Global Development. “Why Forests? Why Now?” (2014).

    • GEF Biodiversity Index

      An index by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) illustrates the varying degrees of biodiversity potential across regions, with the highest in Latin America and the Caribbean followed by East Asia and the Pacific.

    • Urban Population Projections (2014-2050)

      By 2050, urban populations in Africa and Asia are expected to grow by 60% and 80%, respectively. Source: United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2014). World Urbanization Prospects: The 2014 Revision, Highlights (ST/ESA/SER.A/352).

    • Domestic Credit from the Private Sector

      East Asia and the Pacific has the most available capital from the private sector and may present the greatest opportunity for the use of market-based instruments and the crowding in of local investors. Source: World Bank, Databank (accessed 6 January 2015).

    • Vulnerability and Sovereign Risk

      Research shows that there is a high correlation between a country's vulnerability to climate change and its sovereign risk rating. Source: Standard & Poor’s, “Climate Change is a Global Mega-Trend for Sovereign Risk”, CreditWeek vol. 34. No. 20 (2014)

    • Vulnerability and GDP Per Capita

      Research shows that vulnerability to the adverse impacts of climate change is highest in countries with a low per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP) – and, alternatively, lowest where prosperity is high. Source: Standard & Poor’s, “Climate Change is a Global Mega-Trend for Sovereign Risk”, CreditWeek vol. 34. No. 20 (2014).

    • Vulnerability and Agriculture & Forestry

      Research shows that vulnerability to the adverse impacts of climate change is highest in countries that depend heavily on agriculture and forestry as the source of their Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Source: Standard & Poor’s, “Climate Change is a Global Mega-Trend for Sovereign Risk”, CreditWeek vol. 34. No. 20 (2014).